2022-20: Huyer vs Toronto Sun

2022-20: Huyer vs Toronto Sun

May 7, 2022 – for immediate release

The National NewsMedia Council has considered and upheld a complaint about an issue of accuracy in a February 18, 2022 article “Emergencies Act regulations ban protests except for Indigenous or refugees,” published by the Toronto Sun.

The article stated that specific groups of people, including Indigenous peoples and refugees, were exempt from the prohibition on participating in banned protests as part of the federal government’s activation of the Emergencies Act. In particular, the article states that “Under the provisions of the Emergencies Act invoked by the Trudeau government, protests can be banned in certain areas and for most people — but not for First Nations or refugees to Canada.”

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2022-28: Lopes vs Voice of Pelham

April 14, 2022 – for immediate release

The National NewsMedia Council dismissed a complaint about bias and the use of inappropriate language in a March 20 letter to the editor published by the Voice of Pelham.

The letter was published in response to an opinion column that argued that the Canadian flag had been “captured” by protesters during the recent “Freedom Convoy” in Ottawa. The letter writer praised the column and expressed strongly-worded criticism against the protesters.

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2021-99: Holota vs New Canadian Media

March 8, 2022 – for immediate release

The National NewsMedia Council has considered and upheld a complaint about inaccuracy and lack of opportunity to respond to harmful allegations in a December 12, 2021, article, “BIPOC reporter narrates perils of working alone in rural Canada,” published by New Canadian Media.

The article presented the challenges faced by a BIPOC journalist working as an editor and reporter in a small community. In the story, he describes being subjected to vitriolic comments by anti-vaccine proponents, with some relating to race, and recounts his experience reporting his concerns to his employer—regional newspaper chain, Black Press Media—and in particular, editorial director Andrew Holota.

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2021-86: Doherty vs Thamesville Herald

December 30, 2021 – for immediate release

 

The National NewsMedia Council has reviewed and dismissed a complaint about an October 8, 2021, image published on the Thamesville Herald’s Facebook page.

The image depicted the aftermath of a vehicle collision that had taken place earlier that day. The image showed a tow truck, rescue vehicles that had arrived on scene, and a distant view of a vehicle involved in the crash. It carried the caption, “One believed dead after crash on Baseline,” and a brief description of the incident, indicating the road closure.

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2021-79: Yonson vs Ottawa Citizen

November 18, 2021 – for immediate release

The National NewsMedia Council has reviewed and found corrective action was taken to address a complaint about an inaccurate statement in a September 22 opinion column, “Status quo election shows Canada is not a divided nation,” published by the Ottawa Citizen.

The opinion column argued that the recent election was “pointless” and reflected Canadians’ satisfaction with the “status quo.”

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2021-64: Morgan vs Northern Sentinel

September 9, 2021 – for immediate release

The National NewsMedia Council reviewed and dismissed a complaint about the naming of a minor in a June 18, 2021, news article published by the Northern Sentinel.

The article reported on a pride flag ceremony hosted by the RCMP in honour of a 15-year-old transgender student who died earlier that month. The article reported that the event aimed to promote diversity and inclusion, and included quotes from speakers and attendees, including a First Nations chief councillor and the deceased individual’s step-father.

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2021-60: Poulin vs Canadaland

August 20, 2021 – for immediate release

The National NewsMedia Council has reviewed and dismissed a complaint about the labelling, balance and anonymous nature of a May 19, 2021 opinion article “How Bilingualism Promotes the Mediocre,” published by Canadaland.

The opinion column was critical of the federal government’s hiring practices by arguing that official bilingualism unfairly determines the career prospects of public servants based solely on their ability to speak both of Canada’s official languages to a determined level of fluency. The opinion writer specifically identified how non-French speaking people are “de-selected” from working for the federal public service.

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2021-51: Blair, et al. vs Toronto Sun

June 11, 2021 – for immediate release

The National NewsMedia Council has dismissed with reservation a complaint about accuracy in a May 14, 2021 opinion article, “Family left with questions after Brampton senior’s death,” published by the Toronto Sun.

The opinion article told the story of an individual who died after receiving a vaccination against COVID-19. The column calls for a coroner’s inquest into the individual’s death, which was attributed to COVID-19. It includes statements from the deceased individual’s son.

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2021-48: Smith vs Vancouver Sun

May 25, 2021 – for immediate release

The National NewsMedia Council has reviewed and dismissed a complaint about potential negative impact on individuals living with post-traumatic stress disorder based on an April 21, 2021, article, “Off-duty paramedic with PTSD avoids criminal record for dangerous driving,” published by the Vancouver Sun/Province.

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2021-30: Rahman vs National Post

May 4, 2021 – for immediate release

The National NewsMedia Council has dismissed with reservation a complaint that a March 10, 2021, opinion column, “Should one company really be able to dictate which Dr. Seuss books we can read?” in the National Post was inaccurate and promoted racist and harmful viewpoints.

The opinion article dealt with the decision to cease publication of certain Dr. Seuss books that contain racial caricatures. The article also addressed copyright law and the freedom for readers to access contentious pieces of literature.

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